4 New Sessions Added!

OMH in concert with the Statewide Multicultural Advisory Committee has added 4 sessions devoted to multicultural aspects of suicide and suicide prevention. See session details below!

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September 20th 2:30pm – 3:45pm

Session #9

Highlighting Socio-Cultural Constructs for the Consideration of Suicide Prevention in Black and People of Color Communities

Shane M Tull, LMSW, Gay Men of African Descent

Pascale Jean-Noel, LCSW, Center for Practice and Innovations

Antoine Craigwell, DBGM

Panelists will highlight contributing socio-cultural constructs leading to suicide in Black and people of color communities with a view to raising awareness, including efforts against mental health stigma and discrimination; considering race and intergenerational trauma as essential to the “whole” person treatment modality, and providing recommendations for intervention.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand and grasp of the histori-social contexts, with an emphasis on race and both the compounded effect of inter-generational and contemporaneous trauma on the mental health and psyche of a Black or person of color; recognizing that including these considerations are essential to effecting treatment and obtaining concrete results of the “whole” person.
  2. Identify questions to ask and not overlook when assessing people of color. 3
  3. Identify challenges associated with stigma and discrimination as it relates to assessing people of color.

Session #10

Disparities in Suicide Outcomes, the Role of Social Determinants, and the Need for Prevention Strategies

Crystal Lewis, PhD, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

Helen-Maria Lekas, PhD, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

Rafael E. Pérez-Figueroa, MD, MPH, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

Sharifa Z. Williams, DrPH, MS, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

This session will used various forms of data to highlight disparities in suicide risk driven by social determinants, including gender/sexual identities, race/ethnicity, discrimination, violence, and socioeconomic condition. To help inform policy, prevention and intervention strategies in NYS, a theoretical framework that will integrate the panel presentations will be proposed and discussed.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how statewide data can reveal disparities in behavioral health outcomes, namely suicide attempts, when presented alone or in combination with other archival datasets with more nuanced social determinant data.
  2. Identify key social determinants related to various longitudinal suicidal ideation trajectories across young adulthood that can serve as opportunities for prevention and intervention among a cohort of Latino/a’s and Black Americans in New York City.
  3. Explain what is known about suicide behaviors among LGBTQ+ populations, identify knowledge gaps, and highlight recommendations aimed at bridging knowledge and practice.
  4. Identify the constructs that should be included in a theoretical model that frames the risk of suicide among persons of color and/or persons who belong to the LGBTQ+ communities.

September 20th  4:00pm – 5:15PM

Session #15

Increased Suicide Risk Among Transgender and Lesbian, Gay, and Bi-sexual Youth: What Can Done About It?

Sam Brinton, The Trevor Project

Acey Mercer, LMSW, Senior Consultant, Training Institute for Gender, Relationships, Identity, and Sexuality (TIGRIS)

Luciano Reberte, LEAD Program at the Latino Commission on AIDS

This session will provide a review of a case study that highlights the complex harms of conversion therapy that LGBTQ youth are facing and the response mechanisms that The Trevor Project and others are employing to respond to youth in crisis. Additionally, the session will focus on identifying social factors, like social isolation, low self-steam, internalized oppression, and minority stress, that may trigger minority communities to think about or act on suicidal tendencies.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize the harms of conversion therapy to LGBTQ youth and the survivor based advocacy techniques being used to end it.
  2. Identify some protective factors for suicide prevention among transgender individuals.
  3. Identify, address and prevent issues that may impact minority communities, in particular LGBT

September 20th  5:30pm – 6:45PM

Panel Discussion: Unique Considerations in Understanding Suicide in Diverse Populations

Mansour Banilivy, PhD, WellLife Network

Tina Yun Lee, NYS NAMI

Rosa Gil, DSW, Comunilife

Sam Brinton, The Trevor Project

Antoine B. Craigwell, DBGM

Megan Fox, PsyD, University of Rochester

Common approaches to suicide prevention may be more effective in some population groups than others, depending on how a group is viewed and positioned within mainstream society. Understanding social and contextual issues faced by diverse populations could be the basis of more equitable suicide prevention strategies.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand and describe some of the common and unique concerns specific to the LGBTQ community
  2. Understand and describe some of the common and unique concerns specific to the deaf and hard-of-hearing culture
  3. Understand and describe some of the common and unique concerns specific to the Asian, Latino, and Black communities