4 New Sessions Added!

OMH in concert with the Statewide Multicultural Advisory Committee has added 4 sessions devoted to multicultural aspects of suicide and suicide prevention. See program below!

Click here for Full Conference Program

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

8:45-11:00AM REGISTRATION

10:30-11:45AM CONCURRENT SESSIONS

POSTVENTION AND GRIEF WORK

24 HIGH STREET

Vanessa McGann, PhD, American Association of Suicidology

This session will provide guidance for administrators and mental health professionals that is based on recommendations from the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s Survivors of Suicide Loss Taskforce Guidelines and from the clinical literature.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for having clinical training and increased research on survivors of suicide loss.
  • Identify at least three unique aspects of suicide bereavement as well as how to work clinically with those aspects.
  • Describe three ways in which clinicians and administrators can support communities and individual caretakers to reduce the adverse effects of a suicide loss.

 

NOVEL APPROACHES FOR HIGH-RISK SUICIDAL VETERANS

26 HIGH STREET

Sarah Sullivan, MS, MHC-LP, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Page Spears, BS, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Rachel Harris, MA, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Marianne Goodman, MD, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Nidhi Kapil-Pair, PhD, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Veterans account for 18% of suicide deaths nationwide, with their risk of suicide being 21% higher than the civilian population. Twenty veterans die by suicide every day. These concerning numbers demonstrate an urgent need to develop additional, empirically validated interventions for suicidal veterans. This presentation aims to inform attendees about three novel treatment innovations at the VA: Project Life Force (group intervention); Safe Actions for Families to Encourage Recovery (family-based treatment); and Using Telehealth to Improve Outcomes in Veterans at Risk for Suicide (Interactive Voice Response system monitoring).

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the scope of veteran suicide and identify pertinent risk factors.
  • Explain novel clinical interventions being developed for use with high risk suicidal veterans.
  • Compare pre-intervention symptoms to post-intervention outcomes based on the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation.

 

PREVENTION, INTERVENTION AND POSTVENTION: CREATING SUICIDE SAFETY IN SCHOOLS

TOWN HALL

Margi Taber, CASAC, NCAAC, Delphi Drug & Alcohol

Suzanne Catholdi, LMSW, Wayne Beh. Health Network

Joe Fantigrossi, EdD, Lyons Central School District

Lynn Allen, EdD, Putnam/Northern Westchester BOCES

This session will provide an overview of the work that three school systems in New York State have done to create supportive and safe environments for students and faculty.  A focus on collaboration with county agencies, data to inform practices and coordination of resources will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify challenges and solutions in coordinating supports across service sectors.
  • Describe how survey and outcome data can be utilized to create Multi-Tiered Systems of Support in their organizations.
  • List steps to create a Regional Suicide Safety in Schools Leadership Team.

 

IMPLEMENTING SUICIDE SAFER CARE IN NEW YORK STATE

5 FORT ORANGE

Christa Labouliere, PhD, Columbia University

Prabu Vasan, LCSW-R, NYS-OMH Bureau of Evidence Based Services and Implementation Science

Anni Kramer, LMSW, NYS-OMH Bureau of Evidence Based Services and Implementation Science

Melissa Tracy, PhD, University at Albany

This session will provide an overview of the largest implementation of Zero Suicide ever conducted in outpatient care including clinical/implementation data and lessons learned thus far. In addition, an overview of the process and outcome evaluation of New York State’s implementation of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention Grant will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Zero Suicide model and how it was implemented in New York State outpatient behavioral health organizations.
  • Explain how learning collaboratives were used to engage leadership and provide advanced clinical training and implementation assistance.
  • Explain how clinical and implementation practices changed as a result of the suicide prevention projects and their implications for suicide-safer care.

 

12:00 – 2:15PM AWARDS LUNCHEON/PLENARY SESSION   KING STREET BALLROOM

12:00 – 12:25 OPENING REMARKS  

Ann Marie Sullivan, MD, Commissioner, NYS Office of Mental Health

Assemblymember John T. McDonald III

12:25 – 1:15 2018 NYS EXCELLENCE IN SUICIDE PREVENTION AWARDS

1:15 – 2:15 PLENARY SESSION

TRAUMA-INFORMED SUICIDE PREVENTION: WHAT IS IT AND HOW DO WE GET THERE?

KING STREET BALLROOM

Leah Harris, National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors

There is a well-documented intersection between suicide and traumatic experience that remains under-explored in the field of suicide prevention. Weaving stories and science, Ms. Harris will share highlights from her personal resilience-building journey as a suicide attempt survivor and a trauma survivor, as well as insights from her years as a trainer in trauma-informed care and suicide prevention. Using the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA)’s six principles of trauma-informed approaches, and the “Four Truths of Healing” framework developed by international trauma expert, Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, Ms. Hines will explore the myriad impacts of trauma and pathways to resilience. She will also discuss the supreme importance of mutual, respectful relationships, and of listening to and learning from lived experience perspectives.

 

2:30 – 3:45PM CONCURRENT SESSIONS

USING DATA TO INFORM THE DEVELOPMENT OF SUICIDE SAFER CARE

24 HIGH STREET

Angeline Protacio, MPH, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Leah Hines, MPH, NYS Department of Health

Kitty Gelberg, PhD, MPH, NYS Department of Health

New York State is committed to enhancing and improving suicide surveillance data and using it to guide quality improvement initiatives. This session will begin with an overview of how the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene classified suicidal behavior visits and used it to identify space and time clusters of suicidal behavior ED visits in New York City. Then, an in-depth presentation on the data available in the New York Violent Death Reporting System (NYVDRS) will be provided. Last, attendees will be given a tour of the new dashboard on suicide deaths provided as part of the Healthy Connector database.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how syndromic surveillance can be used to identify clusters of suicidal behavior.
  • Describe the data sources for the New York Violent Death Reporting System.
  • Compare the rate of deaths between counties in New York State.

 

PROBLEM SOLVING STRATEGIES FOR SUICIDAL CLIENTS

TOWN HALL

Cory Cunningham, LCSW, Columbia University

Aliza Spruch-Feiner, Columbia University

Problem Solving Therapy posits that suicidal individuals often use suicide to solve problems. This session will provide training in the I.T.C.H. model, a set of problem solving strategies that are easy to learn, recall and apply. In doing so, this model offers clients an alternative to suicide for solving problems.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the I.T.C.H. model, a tool for enhancing suicidal clients’ problem solving skills.
  • Explain the I.T.C.H. model’s clinical applications for suicidal individuals with an introductory case example.
  • Identify common challenges to use of the I.T.C.H. model for suicidal clients and techniques for overcoming those challenges using role play.

 

AN INTRODUCTION TO HELPING STUDENTS AT-RISK FOR SUICIDE AT SCHOOL:  A WORKSHOP FOR STUDENT SERVICES PROFESSIONALS

5 FORT ORANGE

Pat Breux, BSN, Suicide Prevention Center of New York

This session will include an overview of an interactive workshop developed for school professionals to improve the suicide intervention process for students and their families.   The workshop provides an emphasis on ensuring the ongoing safety and well-being of students with suicide risk.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the critical role of student services professionals in helping students at risk for suicide.
  • Identify four steps in the collaborative helping process for students at risk for suicide.
  • Name three critical times for planning to keep a student with suicide risk safe.

 

THE VALUE OF LIVED EXPERIENCE NARRATIVES IN CHANGING ATTITUDES ABOUT SUICIDE

26 HIGH STREET

Leah Harris, National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors

Stigma researchers have found that first person narratives by persons with lived experience are one of the most effective ways to change attitudes over the long term. However, there are special public health considerations to keep in mind when sharing personal narratives about suicide. Ms. Harris will discuss her experience developing the Sound Out For Life! suicide attempt survivors’ speakers bureau, and highlight best practices for sharing lived experience narratives.

Learning objectives:

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the research on anti-stigma campaigns and first person narratives
  • Understand the components of a successful suicide attempt survivor speakers’ bureau
  • Describe public health considerations and best practice guidelines for narrative-sharing

 

HIGHLIGHTING SOCIO-CULTURAL CONSTRUCTS FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF SUICIDE PREVENTION IN BLACK AND PEOPLE OF COLOR COMMUNITIES

8 KING STREET

Shane M Tull, LMSW, Gay Men of African Descent

Pascale Jean-Noel, LCSW, Center for Practice Innovations

Antoine Craigwell, DBGM

Panelists will highlight contributing socio-cultural constructs leading to suicide in Black and people of color communities with a view to raising awareness, including efforts against mental health stigma and discrimination; considering race and intergenerational trauma as essential to the “whole” person treatment modality, and providing recommendations for intervention.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand and grasp the histori-social contexts, with an emphasis on race and both the compounded effect of inter-generational and contemporaneous trauma on the mental health and psyche of a Black or person of color; recognizing that including these considerations are essential to effecting treatment and obtaining concrete results of the “whole” person.
  • Identify questions to ask and not overlook when assessing people of color.
  • Identify challenges associated with stigma and discrimination as it relates to assessing people of color.

 

DISPARITIES IN SUICIDE OUTCOMES, THE ROLE OF SOCIAL DETERMINANTS, AND THE NEED FOR PREVENTION STRATEGIES

SUITE 112

Crystal Lewis, PhD, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

Helen-Maria Lekas, PhD, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

Rafael E. Pérez-Figueroa, MD, MPH, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

Sharifa Z. Williams, DrPH, MS, Nathan S. Kline Institute (NKI) for Psychiatric Research

This session will use various forms of data to highlight disparities in suicide risk driven by social determinants, including gender/sexual identities, race/ethnicity, discrimination, violence, and socioeconomic condition. To help inform policy, prevention and intervention strategies in NYS, a theoretical framework that will integrate the panel presentations will be proposed and discussed.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how statewide data can reveal disparities in behavioral health outcomes, namely suicide attempts, when presented alone or in combination with other archival datasets with more nuanced social determinant data.
  • Identify key social determinants related to various longitudinal suicidal ideation trajectories across young adulthood that can serve as opportunities for prevention and intervention among a cohort of Latino/a’s and Black Americans in New York City.
  • Explain what is known about suicide behaviors among LGBTQ+ populations, identify knowledge gaps, and highlight recommendations aimed at bridging knowledge and practice.
  • Identify the constructs that should be included in a theoretical model that frames the risk of suicide among persons of color and/or persons who belong to the LGBTQ+ communities.

4:00 – 5:15PM CONCURRENT SESSIONS

 

SCHOOL COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS:  GROWING OUR PREVENTION CAPACITY

TOWN HALL

Renee Rider, NYS Department of Education

Donna Bradbury, NYS Office of Mental Health, Division of Integrated Community Services for Children and Families

Amanda Davidson, Youth Power

Glenn Liebman, Mental Health Association of NYS

An expanding list of statewide initiatives are having an impact on youth suicide prevention on the local level. In this session, State Education and Mental Health leaders will share information about new legislation, initiatives, and tools that are- shaping the school-based prevention landscape.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how prevention resources for schools are being supported through efforts of the Office of Mental Health.
  • Describe how the Mental Health in Education law is being rolled out and the role of the Mental Health in Education Resource Center
  • Describe how Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Standards and School Counseling Plans are influencing the prevention landscape in NY schools and how to access resources on evidence-based and best practices in SEDL.

 

THE ROLE OF SOCIAL CONNECTEDNESS IN REDUCING RISK FOR SUICIDE ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

8 KING STREET

Kim Van Orden, PhD, University of Rochester

Chelsey Hartley, PhD, University of Rochester

Caroline Silva, PhD, University of Rochester

Annabelle Mournet, University of Rochester

Social connectedness is associated with reduced risk for suicide ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide deaths across the lifespan. This panel will consider several manifestations of social connectedness – from more structural forms involving characteristics of the social network—to more subjective forms involving perceptions of belonging and perceived burden on others. An emphasis will be placed on ways in which connectedness that is strongly linked to suicide risk may manifest differently across the lifespan.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the impact of social connectedness on the trajectory of depression to serve as potential intervention target.
  • Identify which factors are associated with neighborhood belonging among Hispanics in midlife.
  • Distinguish between different types of impairments (self-care, activities of daily living, social participation, etc.) and identify their relationship to the constructs of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness.

 

COALITION INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING: 2019 AND BEYOND (by invitation only)

5 FORT ORANGE

Garra Lloyd-Lester, Suicide Prevention Center of New York

This interactive session will include a presentation of the menu of current infrastructure funding opportunities for New York State Suicide Prevention Coalitions including an overview of the funding structure and requirements. This session is invite only and a requirement for coalition representatives. Participants will be encouraged to share ideas and ask questions.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the funding opportunities available for coalitions from SPCNY for 2019 and beyond.
  • Identify the resources necessary to develop a successful proposal

 

NEW YORKERS ADVANCING SUICIDE SAFER CARE (NYASSC) INITIATIVE: INTRODUCTION TO THE LEARNING COLLABORATIVE

24 HIGH STREET

Jay Carruthers, MD, Suicide Prevention Office

Sigrid Pechenik, PsyD, Suicide Prevention Office

Virna Little, PsyD, LCSW-r, MBA, CCM, SAP, CUNY School of Public Health

This session is by invitation ONLY and is for participants of the federally funded SAMHSA grant.

This session will provide an overview of the NYASSC initiative, a federally-funded Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grant focusing on implementation of the Zero Suicide model in health and behavioral healthcare.   It includes a review of the role of learning collaborative participants, an overview of clinical trainings protocols and information regarding project implementation. Additionally, a presentation on the optimization of electronic health record functionality to help support suicide safe care will be provided.  Finally, reviewing the utilization of the problem lists and other structured data sections will occur in order to identify and track patient populations at risk for suicide.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the purpose NYASSC Initiative’s Learning Collaborative
  • Identify the training requirements of the initiative
  • Optimize use of electronic health records for suicide safer care as well as identifying and managing population of patients at risk.

INCREASED SUICIDE RISK AMONG TRANSGENDER AND LESBIAN, GAY, AND BI-SEXUAL YOUTH: WHAT CAN DONE ABOUT IT?

26 HIGH STREET

Sam Brinton, The Trevor Project

Acey Mercer, LMSW, Training Institute for Gender, Relationships, Identity, and Sexuality (TIGRIS)

Luciano Reberte, LEAD Program at the Latino Commission on AIDS

This session will provide a review of a case study that highlights the complex harms of conversion therapy that LGBTQ youth are facing and the response mechanisms that The Trevor Project and others are employing to respond to youth in crisis. Additionally, the session will focus on identifying social factors, like social isolation, low self-steam, internalized oppression, and minority stress, that may trigger minority communities to think about or act on suicidal tendencies.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the harms of conversion therapy to LGBTQ youth and the survivor based advocacy techniques being used to end it.
  • Identify some protective factors for suicide prevention among transgender individuals.
  • Identify, address and prevent issues that may impact minority communities, in particular the LGBTQ community.

5:15 – 6:30PM  NETWORKING RECEPTION

KOI POND POSTER SESSION

AFSP QUILT DISPLAY

5:30 – 6:45PM PANEL DISCUSSION: UNIQUE CONSIDERATIONS IN UNDERSTANDING SUICIDE IN DIVERSE POPULATIONS

5 FORT ORANGE

Mansour Banilivy, PhD, WellLife Network

Tina Yun Lee, NYS NAMI

Rosa Gil, DSW, Comunilife

Sam Brinton, The Trevor Project

Antoine B. Craigwell, DBGM

Megan Fox, PsyD, University of Rochester

Common approaches to suicide prevention may be more effective in some population groups than others, depending on how a group is viewed and positioned within mainstream society. Understanding social and contextual issues faced by diverse populations could be the basis of more equitable suicide prevention strategies.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand and describe some of the common and unique concerns specific to the LGBTQ community
  • Understand and describe some of the common and unique concerns specific to the deaf and hard-of-hearing culture
  • Understand and describe some of the common and unique concerns specific to the Asian, Latino, and Black communities

 

6:45PM  DINNER ON YOUR OWN

 

8:00 – 10:00PM SCREENING OF THE S-WORD FOLLOWED BY PANEL DISCUSSION WITH NYS EXPERTS

TOWN HALL

Garra Lloyd-Lester, Suicide Prevention Center of New York

Leah Harris, National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors

Misha Kessler, Remedient and Seven Summits for Suicide Prevention

Tony Trahan, Office of Consumer Affairs

Synopsis: THE S WORD is a powerful feature documentary by an award winning team that puts a human face on a topic that has long been stigmatized and buried with the lives it has claimed. The film gives a platform to those with lived experience – people who have attempted to take their own lives and survived to tell their stories. Capturing personal revelations and surprising moments of humor, THE S WORD offers a view through the eyes of those who have been there and are now committed to preventing others from getting to that edge. It presents an intimate look into the lives of these survivors and their loved ones, and within this unique and personal approach, THE S WORD gives us all a guide to a future with fewer suicides.

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2018

7:30 – 8:30AM REGISTRATION & BREAKFAST

FORT ORANGE SQUARE & KOI POND

 

8:30 – 9:45AM PLENARY SESSION

THEMES FROM THE GOVERNOR’S SUICIDE PREVENTION TASK FORCE

KING STREET BALLROOM

Co-Chairs of Governor Cuomo’s Suicide Prevention Task Force

Christopher Tavella, PhD, Executive Deputy Commissioner, NY State Office of Mental Health

Peter Wyman, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, University of Rochester School of Medicine

In November 2017, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the formation of the New York State Suicide Prevention Task Force that includes leaders from state agencies, local governments, not-for-profit groups, and other recognized experts in suicide prevention. Governor Cuomo instructed that “The Suicide Prevention Task Force will focus on high-risk communities and groups to build on our efforts to address this challenge, and help build a stronger, healthier New York for all.” Members were tasked with examining and evaluating current suicide prevention programs, services and policies. Recommendations will be made to increase access, awareness, and support for children, adolescents and adults in need of assistance. Dr. Tavella and Dr. Wyman will discuss major themes from the Task Force.

 

10:00 – 11:15AM CONCURRENT SESSIONS

THE INTERPERSONAL THEORY OF SUICIDE ACROSS DIVERSE POPULATIONS

24&26 HIGH STREET

Kim Van Orden, PhD, University of Rochester

Meghan Fox, PsyD, LMHC, University of Rochester

Caroline Silva, PhD, University of Rochester

The Interpersonal Theory of Suicide is a contemporary psychological theory of suicide with considerable empirical support. This panel will consider ways in which belonging and perceived burden may manifest differently in diverse populations and how those differences are considered when adapting assessment tools for languages other than English.  Our presenters will discuss research projects on adapting the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire that was designed to measure belonging and perceived burden in American Sign Language, Spanish and Chinese.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe a cultural difference specific to deaf culture that may explain how the experience of being deaf influences experiences of social connectedness.
  • Describe the process of translation of a Spanish language measure of social connectedness and use of qualitative data for further scale adaptation and refinement.
  • Describe a cultural difference that may explain why translating the INQ item “I feel like I belong” into Chinese was challenging.

 

NEW YORK STATE’S “WAY FORWARD: PATHWAYS TO HOPE AND RECOVERY WITH INSIGHTS FROM LIVED EXPERIENCE”

9 FORT ORANGE

Sarah Felman, Mental Health Empowerment Project

Tony Trahan, Office of Consumer Affairs

This session will provide an overview of the Alternatives to Suicide peer support groups that were established in 2009 by the Western Mass Recovery Learning Communities as an alternative framework for providing mutual support to those experiencing suicidal thoughts. Although suicide is prevalent within our culture, it is often a topic that is taboo and cannot be discussed openly. The Alternatives to Suicide peer support groups aim to break down that stigma, allowing people to openly discuss suicidal thoughts and feelings of deep despair as mutual support is provided. Additionally, an overview of the National Action Alliance’s publication the Way Forward will be provided, including New York State specific applications.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the history of the Alternatives to Suicide framework
  • Contrast the Alternatives to Suicide Framework with the traditional medical model
  • Identify ways in which New York State has applied recommendations from the Way Forward publication.

 

SUICIDE ALERTNESS FOR EVERYONE TRAINING (SAFETALK)- PART 1

SUITE 112

safeTALK is a half-day alertness training that prepares anyone 15 or older, regardless of prior experience or training, to become a suicide-alert helper. Most people with thoughts of suicide don’t truly want to die, but are struggling with the pain in their lives. Through their words and actions, they invite help to stay alive. safeTALK-trained helpers can recognize these invitations and take action by connecting them with life-saving intervention resources, such as caregivers trained in ASIST.

*Attendees must attend both safeTALK sessions. This session is limited to 30 pre-registrations; participants will receive an entry pass.

 

CLINICAL ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF YOUTH SUICIDE RISK

TOWN HALL

Christa Labouliere, PhD, Columbia University

Mansour (Max) Banilivy, PhD, WellLife Network

Silvia Giliotti, PhD, LCSW, NYS Suicide Prevention Office

This clinical training provides guidance to youth-serving clinicians on suicide-safer care for children and adolescents. Clinicians will learn developmentally-appropriate adaptations to screening, risk assessment, clinical interventions, and follow-up/monitoring necessary for working successfully with youth and families. Guidelines for providing suicide safer care across developmental periods and different settings will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Assess, Intervene, and Monitor for Suicide Prevention (AIM-SP) model, NYS’ implementation of the Zero Suicide model of suicide safer care.
  • Explain the adaptations to AIM-SP screening, risk assessment, and clinical management procedures needed to work successfully with youth and their families.
  • Identify how AIM-SP screening, risk assessment, and clinical management procedures can be adapted to different treatment settings or for different developmental periods.

 

11:30AM – 12:45PM CONCURRENT SESSIONS

CREATING SAFER COMMUNITIES FOR VETERANS

TOWN HALL

Joseph Hunter, PhD, LCSW, MSW, BS, Stratton VA Medical Center

Kelsey Simons, PhD, MSW, Canandaigua VAMC

Eric Hardiman, PhD, University at Albany

This session will provide an overview of three innovative projects designed to keep veterans safe from suicide. The first is a gatekeeper model designed to target faith-based communities. The second project examined the social and environmental context of care as an important consideration in reducing suicide risk and supporting the well-being of older veterans during a care transition from inpatient general medical settings to the community. The session will conclude with a presentation on first-person insight into how veterans theorize and understand suicide, as well as risk and protective factors. Implications for program design and delivery of interventions will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain a gatekeeper training model that is designed to empower faith-based communities to prevent veteran suicide.
  • Identify the changing context of care as a potential factor in outcomes for older veterans.
  • Describe how the inclusion of veteran theories of suicide can impact program development and intervention design.

 

ENGAGING AND SUPPORTING FAMILIES IN SUICIDE PREVENTION

24&26 HIGH STREET

Perry Hoffman, PhD, National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder

Silvia Giliotti, PhD, New York State Suicide Prevention Office

Luciana Guardiano Payne, PhD, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School

There are many ways family members and caregivers help individuals struggling with suicidality. This presentation will focus on how providers can meaningfully engage and include families whose loved ones are in suicidal crisis or have attempted suicide. The presentation will highlight current research and share one example of family programming geared toward families of individuals who have attempted suicide.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role family members can play in suicide prevention.
  • Identify strategies to engage families in suicide prevention.
  • Explain key communication skills for families to learn to support the reduction of emotional intensity both for the family members and the person at risk.

 

SUICIDE ALERTNESS FOR EVERYONE TRAINING (SAFETALK)- PART 2

SUITE 112 – THIS SESSION WILL CONCLUDE AT 1:00PM

This session is part 2 of the 10AM session. Attendees must attend both sessions.

 

INTEGRATING MEANS REDUCTION COUNSELING INTO SAFETY PLANNING

2 KING STREET

David Lowenthal, MD, JD, New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University

Means Reduction Counseling is an approach used by clinicians to help suicidal individuals reduce their access to methods they are likely to use in a suicide attempt.  While it is an integral part of safety planning, many clinicians remain unconvinced of its effectiveness and/or uncomfortable with the steps involved in the counseling, namely, asking about specific means that a client may be contemplating to use to attempt suicide and working collaboratively with that client to reduce access to those means.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Define means reduction and recognize its importance in the context of Safety Planning.
  • Learn how to integrate means reduction counseling into standard practice.
  • Appreciate its importance through the use of clinical case examples.